"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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Endorsed by 2,110
State Legislators
In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
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Entrepreneur Tom Golisano Endorses National Popular Vote

Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Advisory Board
    John Anderson (R-I–IL)
    Birch Bayh (D–IN)
    John Buchanan (R–AL)
    Tom Campbell (R–CA)
    Tom Downey (D–NY)
    D. Durenberger (R–MN)
    Jake Garn (R–UT)
    What Do You Think
    How should we elect the President?
    The candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states.
    The current Electoral College system.

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    Missouri

    JEFFERSON CITY, February 2012 — The National Popular Vote bill (HB 1719) was introduced in the Missouri House of Representatives by a bipartisan group including House Speaker Steve Tilley (R), Minority Leader Mike Talboy (D), House Elections Chair Tony Dugger (R), as well as Representatives Pat Conway (D), Stephen Webber (D), Clem Smith (D), Dave Hinson (R), and Sue Entlicher (R).

    In April 2011, the National Popular Vote bill (HB 974) was introduced in the Missouri House of Representatives by a bipartisan group of five Republican and five Democrats, including House Speaker Steve Tilley (R), Minority Leader Mike Talboy (D), Assistant Minority Floor Leader Tishaura Jones (D), Minority Caucus Secretary Sarah Lampe (D) and House Elections Chair Tony Dugger (R) as well as Representatives Pat Conway (D), Dave Hinson (R), Lincoln Hough (R), Todd L. Richardson (R), and Stephen Webber (D).

    In January 2009, the National Popular Vote bill was introduced into the Missouri House of Representatives by Representatives Jeff Roorda, Ron Casey, John P. Burnett, Joseph Fallert, Jr., J.C. Kuessner, Bert Atkins, and Ed Schieffer (HB 452).

    On January 23, 2007, Missouri Representatives Jeff Roorda, Sam Page, Belinda Harris, Edward Wildberger, Ron Casey, and Jason R. Holsman introduced the National Popular Vote bill (HB 289) (Status of HB 289) in the House of Representatives for the 2007 legislative session.

    In 2006, the National Popular Vote bill (HB 2090) was sponsored by

  • Representative Robert Thane Johnson (R) and
  • Representative Jeff Roorda (D)
  • On April 25, 2006, the Missouri House Elections Committee held an informational hearing on National Popular Vote's bill and heard testimony from former Congressman John Anderson (R–Illinois and Independent presidential candidate), John Buchanan (the first Republican to represent Birmingham, Alabama in Congress), and National Popular Vote President Barry Fadem.

    National Popular Vote has the support of 66% of Missouri voters in an August-September 2005 poll and the support of 70% of Missouri voters in an October 2005 poll.




    Missouri Rep. Robert Thane Johnson
    Legislative Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Jeff Roorda
    Legislative Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Sam Page
    Legislative Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Belinda Harris
    Legislative Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Edward Wildberger
    Legislative Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Ron Casey
    Legislative Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Jason R. Holsman
    Legislative Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Bert Atkins
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Ed Schieffer
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. J.C. Kuessner
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. John P. Burnett
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Joseph Fallert, Jr.
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Pat Conway
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Tony Dugger
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Dave Hinson
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Lincoln Hough
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Tishaura O. Jones
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Sara Lampe
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Todd L. Richardson
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Mike Talboy
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Steven Tilley
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Stephen Webber
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Clem Smith
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Dave Hinson
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Missouri Rep. Sue Entlicher
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site
    Under the current system of electing the President, a candidate may win a majority of the Electoral College without having a majority of the nationwide popular vote. The National Popular Vote bill would reform the Electoral College by guaranteeing the Presidency to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia). The bill would enact the proposed interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote." The compact would take effect only when enacted, in identical form, by states possessing a majority of the membership of the Electoral College (that is 270 of 538 electoral votes). Under the compact, all of the members of the Electoral College from all states belonging to the compact would be from the same political party as the winner of nationwide popular vote. Thus, the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia) will be guaranteed a majority of the Electoral College, and hence the Presidency. Because the compact guarantees a majority of the Electoral College to the winner of most popular votes nationwide, the compact has the additional benefit of eliminating the possibility that a presidential election might be thrown into the U.S. House of Representatives (with each state casting one vote).


    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President