"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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Endorsed by 2,110
State Legislators
In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
Progress by State

Tom Golisano

Entrepreneur Tom Golisano Endorses National Popular Vote

Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Advisory Board
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    Birch Bayh (D–IN)
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    Tom Campbell (R–CA)
    Tom Downey (D–NY)
    D. Durenberger (R–MN)
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    The candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states.
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    Illinois

    SPRINGFIELD, April 7, 2008 — Illinois became the third state to enact the National Popular Vote bill.

    On May 12, 2011, former Illinois governor Jim Edgar (R) endorsed the National Popular Vote bill at a press conference at the National Press Club in Washington DC.

    Jim Edgar at National Press Club

    On January 9, 2008, the Illinois House of Representatives passed the National Popular Vote bill (HB 1685   Status of HB 1685), thus sending the bill to Governor Rod R. Blagojevich for his signature.    Op-Ed by Rob Buck    AP story

    On May 31, 2007, the Illinois Senate passed the National Popular Vote bill.

    On May 2, the Illinois House of Representatives passed the original National Popular Vote bill (HB 858) (Status of HB 858)

    In an article in Medill Report, Representative Robert S. Molaro was quoted as saying:

    "This puts us back in play. With this bill, how much you win or lose by matters."

    Illinois state Sen. Kirk W. Dillard (R-Hinsdale), a chief co-sponsor of the bill who is also chairman of the DuPage County Republican Party said:

    "I think the bill is good for both political parties in Illinois since we've been neglected by national presidential candidates of both parties,"

    "I believe this change doesn't help either party, it helps the American public's interest. Americans never quite get the Electoral College. It makes the public feel their vote doesn't count."

    "I've studied a myth among some Republicans that this empowers cities. The statistics do not bear that out."

    Dan Johnson-Weinberger, president of Progressive Public Affairs said:

    "The current system is bad for two reasons -- the popular-vote winner doesn't always win, and it only matters how certain battleground states vote."

    On April 18, the House Elections and Campaign Reform Committee approved the bill.

    In February 2007, Illinois Senators Jacqueline Collins and Kirk W. Dillard (chief co-sponsor) introduced the 2007 version of the National Popular Vote bill in the Legislature (SB 78) (Status of SB 78). Representative Bob Molaro has introduced the bill (HB 858) into the House.

    Illinois was the state where the National Popular Vote bill was first introduced (January 19, 2006). In the Illinois Senate, the bill (SB 2724) was sponsored in 2006 by Senators Jacqueline Collins (D), Kirk W. Dillard (Du Page County Republican Party Chair), and James T. Meeks (I). In the Illinois House, the bill (HB 5777) was sponsored by Representatives Robert S. Molaro (D) and Jim Durkin (R). By the end of 2006, the Illinois bills had a total of 48 sponsors. (There are 118 House members and 59 Senators in Illinois).

    In 2006, Illinois State Senator Kirk W. Dillard said:

    "This isn't a Democratic or Republican issue to me. It's important that people have faith that in the election of the most important office in the world that their vote will count. I'm proud to sponsor legislation that will hopefully result in presidential candidates showing up and working to meet voters in my state."



    Illinois Senator Jacqueline Y. Collins
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Senator Kirk W. Dillard
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Robert S. Molaro
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Paul D. Froehlich
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Senator James T. Meeks
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Senator Mattie Hunter
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Senator Don Harmon
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Senator Iris Y. Martinez
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Senator Rickey R. Hendon
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Senator Martin A. Sandoval
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Sidney H. Mathias
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. John A. Fritchey
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Thomas Holbrook
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Jack McGuire
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Mike Boland
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Kathleen A. Ryg
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Mary E.
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Barbara Flynn Currie
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Jack D. Franks
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Senator William Delgado
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Annazette Collins
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Karen May
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Robin Kelly
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. David E. Miller
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Sara Feigenholtz
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. William Davis
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Esther Golar
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Brandon W. Phelps
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Lisa M. Dugan
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Constance A. Howard
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Naomi D. Jakobsson
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Monique D. Davis
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Eddie Washington
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Deborah L. Graham
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Careen M. Gordon
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Karen A. Yarbrough
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Wyvetter H. Younge
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Elaine Nekritz
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Carolyn H. Krause
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Cynthia Soto
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Joseph M. Lyons
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Linda Chapa LaVia
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Calvin L. Giles
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Daniel V. Beiser
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Kurt M. Granberg
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Kenneth Dunkin
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Senator Donne E. Trotter


    Illinois Senator Susan Garrett


    Illinois Senator Kimberly A. Lightford


    Illinois Senator Michael Noland


    Illinois Rep. Julie Hamos


    Illinois Rep. Elga L. Jefferies


    Illinois Rep. Maria Antonia Berrios


    Illinois Rep. Frank J. Mautino


    Illinois Rep. Al Riley


    Illinois Rep. Richard T. Bradley


    Illinois Rep. Daniel J. Burke
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Senator Kwame Raoul
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Lou Lang
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Kevin A. McCarthy
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Luis Arroyo
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Arthur L. Turner
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Michael K. Smith
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Elizabeth Hernandez
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Greg Harris
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Patrick J. Verschoore
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Senator Terry Link
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Charles E. Jefferson
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Edward J. Acevedo
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Jay C. Hoffman
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. LaShawn K. Ford
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Marlow H. Colvin
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Susana A. Mendoza
    Legislative Web Site


    Illinois Rep. Jim Durkin
    Legislative Web Site
    Under the current system of electing the President, a candidate may win a majority of the Electoral College without having a majority of the nationwide popular vote. The National Popular Vote bill would reform the Electoral College by guaranteeing the Presidency to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia). The bill would enact the proposed interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote." The compact would take effect only when enacted, in identical form, by states possessing a majority of the membership of the Electoral College (that is 270 of 538 electoral votes). Under the compact, all of the members of the Electoral College from all states belonging to the compact would be from the same political party as the winner of nationwide popular vote. Thus, the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia) will be guaranteed a majority of the Electoral College, and hence the Presidency. Because the compact guarantees a majority of the Electoral College to the winner of most popular votes nationwide, the compact has the additional benefit of eliminating the possibility that a presidential election might be thrown into the U.S. House of Representatives (with each state casting one vote).


    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President