"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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Endorsed by 2,110
State Legislators
In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
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Entrepreneur Tom Golisano Endorses National Popular Vote

Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Advisory Board
    John Anderson (R-I–IL)
    Birch Bayh (D–IN)
    John Buchanan (R–AL)
    Tom Campbell (R–CA)
    Tom Downey (D–NY)
    D. Durenberger (R–MN)
    Jake Garn (R–UT)
    What Do You Think
    How should we elect the President?
    The candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states.
    The current Electoral College system.

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    Washington DC

    WASHINGTON, DC, October 12, 2010 — District of Columbia Mayor Adrian Fenty signed the signed the National Popular Vote bill. The bill was previously approved by the District of Columbia Council by unanimous consent. The National Popular Vote bill is one of numerous interstate compacts entered into by the District of Columbia Council under the Home Rule Act of 1973.      (Status of bill 18-0769)      CNBC Story      Hendrik Hertzberg in New Yorker      Reuters story      Non-Profit Vote Blog

    On September 21, 2010 , the District of Columbia Council passed the National Popular Vote bill by unanimous consent.      Washington Examiner article      (Status of bill 18-0769)


    The District of Columbia meeting on September 21, 2010

    In July, the Committee of the Whole of the District of Columbia Council passed the National Popular Vote bill by an 11-2 vote.

    On May 19, 2010, a hearing (video) in the Committee on Government Operations and the Environment of the District of Columbia Council was held on the National Popular Vote bill (Bill 18-0769). The following items were among the written submissions made at the May 19, 2010 hearing of Committee on Government Operations and the Environment chaired by Council member Mary Cheh:

    • Testimony of Dr. Robert A. Holmes, Georgia State Representative 1975-2008
    • Testimony of former Congressman John Buchanan (R – Alabama)
    • Article by Maryland state Senator Jamie Raskin entitled "Electoral College Organizers: The National Popular Vote Movement Rises" on American Constitution Society blog
    • FairVote letter from Robert Richie
    • Legal analysis by Amanda Rolat of the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law
    • Testimony of Keshini Ladduwahetty, a resident of Ward 3
    • Testimony of Christopher Pearson, Vermont State Representative (2006-2008)
    • Answering 61 Objections that are Sometimes Raised in Connection with the National Popular Vote Bill by Dr. John R. Koza
    • Explanation of bill submitted by National Popular Vote
    • Letter from DC Chapter of NAACP from Eugene D. Kinlow
    • Letter from National Coalition on Black Civic Participation from Melanic L. Campbell
    • Letter from National Black Caucus of State Legislators from Calvin Smyre
    • FairVote report on 2008's Shrinking Battleground and Its Stark Impact on Campaign Activity

    On April 20, 2010, the National Popular Vote bill (Bill 18-0769) was introduced in the District of Columbia Council by Chairman Vincent C. Gray and Councilmembers Mary M. Cheh, Yvette Alexander David A. Catania, Marion Barry, Jim Graham, Kwame Brown, Jack Evans, Michael Brown, Tommy Wells, and Harry Thomas, Jr.

    A survey of 800 District of Columbia voters conducted on February 9–10, 2010 showed 76% overall support for the idea that the President of the United States should be the candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states.

    Voters were asked "How do you think we should elect the President? Should it be the candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states, or the current electoral college system?"

    By gender, support was 79% among women and 73% among men. By age, support was 70% among 18-29 year olds, 66% among 30-45 year olds, 83% among 46-65 year olds, and 81% for those older than 65.

    By race, support was 84% among African-Americans, 66% among whites, 50% among Hispanics (representing 5% of the respondents), and 87% among others (representing 4% of the respondents).

    Support was 81% among union households and 76% among others. Support was 65% in Ward 1, 64% in Ward 2, 69% in Ward 3, 78% in Ward 4, 77% of Ward 5, 81% in Ward 6, 92% in Ward 7, and 78% in Ward 8.

    By political affiliation, support for a national popular vote was 80% among Democrats, 74% of independents (74%), and 48% among Republicans (representing 8% of the respondents).

    The survey was conducted by Public Policy Polling, and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3 1/2%.




    District of Columbia Councilmember Mary Cheh
    Legislative Web Site


    District of Columbia Councilmember David Catania
    Legislative Web Site


    District of Columbia Councilmember Harry Thomas Jr.
    Legislative Web Site


    District of Columbia Councilmember Jack Evans
    Legislative Web Site


    District of Columbia Councilmember Jim Graham
    Legislative Web Site


    District of Columbia Councilmember Kwame Brown
    Legislative Web Site


    District of Columbia Councilmember Marion Barry
    Legislative Web Site


    District of Columbia Councilmember Micahel Brown
    Legislative Web Site


    District of Columbia Councilmember Tommy Wells
    Legislative Web Site


    District of Columbia Councilmember Vincent Gray
    Legislative Web Site


    District of Columbia Councilmember Yvette Alexander
    Legislative Web Site
    Under the current system of electing the President, a candidate may win a majority of the Electoral College without having a majority of the nationwide popular vote. The National Popular Vote bill would reform the Electoral College by guaranteeing the Presidency to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia). The bill would enact the proposed interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote." The compact would take effect only when enacted, in identical form, by states possessing a majority of the membership of the Electoral College (that is 270 of 538 electoral votes). Under the compact, all of the members of the Electoral College from all states belonging to the compact would be from the same political party as the winner of nationwide popular vote. Thus, the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia) will be guaranteed a majority of the Electoral College, and hence the Presidency. Because the compact guarantees a majority of the Electoral College to the winner of most popular votes nationwide, the compact has the additional benefit of eliminating the possibility that a presidential election might be thrown into the U.S. House of Representatives (with each state casting one vote).


    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President