"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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Endorsed by 2,110
State Legislators
In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
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Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Colorado

    DENVER, March 17, 2009 — The Colorado House of Representatives today passed the National Popular Vote bill (HB 1299).


    Colorado Representative Andrew Kerr, sponsor of the National Popular Vote bill in Colorado, speaking during House debate on March 17, 2009.

    A survey of 800 Colorado voters conducted on December 21-22, 2008 showed 68% overall support for a national popular vote for President.      December 2008 Colorado poll

    On January 24, 2007, the Colorado State Senate approved the National Popular Vote bill ( SB-07-046 ). The Senate's approval on third (final) reading followed the Senate's approval on second reading on January 22. The bill was approved by the Senate Committee on State, Veterans and Military Affairs on January 17.

    Colorado Senate Majority Leader Ken Gordon presents National Popular Vote bill to Senate Committee on State, Veterans and Military Affairs on January 17, 2007

    Representative Jack Pommer is sponsoring the National Popular Vote bill in the Colorado House of Representatives.

    The bill was introduced into Colorado Legislature on January 10, 2007, by Colorado Senate Majority Leader Ken Gordon. The National Popular Vote bill would enact an interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote" in Colorado.

    In 2006, Colorado's Senate was the first state legislative house in the nation to pass National Popular Vote's legislation for nationwide election of the President (SB 06-223). Among the Senators voting for the bill on its third reading on April 17, 2006, were Senators Ken Gordon (D), John Evans (R), and Lew Entz (R). During debate on April 14, Senate Majority Leader Ken Gordon said,

    "We're trying to count every vote equally, … We think the president should be the person who gets the majority vote. It's the bedrock of our democracy."

    Senator Evan (R–Parker) said on April 14,

    "This bill addresses some serious flaws in the Electoral College process."

    The Colorado Senate's action on April 17, 2006, followed a favorable vote on the bill's second reading on April 14, 2006, and a favorable vote on April 10, 2006, in the Senate Judiciary Committee. At that time, the committee heard testimony from Colorado Common Cause Executive Director Pete Maysmith, National Popular Vote President Barry Fadem, Dr. John R. Koza (originator of the National Popular Vote bill), and Colorado attorney Mark Grueskin. A Denver Post editorial on April 19, 2006, said it is "time to rethink presidential elections."

    In a statement on April 15, 2006, referring to the Colorado Senate's favorable vote on the bill's second reading, Senator Gordon said,

    "This is the bill that would join Colorado in a compact of states who would all agree to send their votes to the person who receives the largest popular vote in the country. The compact only goes into effect if states representing a majority of the Electoral College join. Right now not everyone's vote is equal in electing a President. I think it makes sense to make the President the person who gets the most votes. It is revolutionary, I admit. It is called democracy. I know some people are concerned. It is a big change, and I don't want to discount the concerns of people who feel we should be cautious, but I believe that if the framers of the Constitution were around now they would favor a woman's right to vote, they would oppose slavery and they would support electing the President by majority vote."




    Colorado Senator Ken Gordon
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Colorado Rep. Jack Pommer
    Legislative Web Site


    Colorado Rep. Beth McCann
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Colorado Rep. Christine Scanlan
    Legislative Web Site
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    Colorado Rep. Debbie Benefield
    Legislative Web Site
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    Colorado Rep. Dickey Lee Hullinghorst
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Colorado Rep. Edward Casso
    Legislative Web Site
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    Colorado Rep. Edward Vigil
    Legislative Web Site
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    Colorado Rep. Gwyn Green
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Colorado Rep. Joe Miklosi
    Legislative Web Site
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    Colorado Rep. John Kefalas
    Legislative Web Site
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    Colorado Rep. Judy Solano
    Legislative Web Site
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    Colorado Rep. K. Jerry Frangas
    Legislative Web Site
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    Colorado Rep. Karen Middleton
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Colorado Rep. Kathleen E. Curry
    Legislative Web Site
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    Colorado Rep. Lois Court
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Colorado Rep. Mark Ferrandino
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Colorado Rep. Nancy Todd
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Colorado Rep. Sue Schafer
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Colorado Rep. Terrance Carroll
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Colorado Senator Bob Bacon
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Colorado Senator Chris Romer
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Colorado Senator Jennifer Veiga
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    Colorado Senator Peter C. Groff
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site
    Under the current system of electing the President, a candidate may win a majority of the Electoral College without having a majority of the nationwide popular vote. The National Popular Vote bill would reform the Electoral College by guaranteeing the Presidency to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia). The bill would enact the proposed interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote." The compact would take effect only when enacted, in identical form, by states possessing a majority of the membership of the Electoral College (that is 270 of 538 electoral votes). Under the compact, all of the members of the Electoral College from all states belonging to the compact would be from the same political party as the winner of nationwide popular vote. Thus, the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia) will be guaranteed a majority of the Electoral College, and hence the Presidency. Because the compact guarantees a majority of the Electoral College to the winner of most popular votes nationwide, the compact has the additional benefit of eliminating the possibility that a presidential election might be thrown into the U.S. House of Representatives (with each state casting one vote).


    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President