"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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Endorsed by 2,110
State Legislators
In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
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Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Advisory Board
    John Anderson (R-I–IL)
    Birch Bayh (D–IN)
    John Buchanan (R–AL)
    Tom Campbell (R–CA)
    Tom Downey (D–NY)
    D. Durenberger (R–MN)
    Jake Garn (R–UT)
    What Do You Think
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    The candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states.
    The current Electoral College system.

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    California

    SACRAMENTO, August 8, 2011 — California Governor Jerry Brown has signed the National Popular Vote bill, making California the 9th jurisdiction to enact the bill. On January 13, 2012, the Department of Justice cleared the National Popular Vote bill under the Voting Rights Act.    Letter

    On July 14, 2011, the California Senate passed the National Popular Vote bill, thereby sending it to Governor Jerry Brown.


    July 15, 2011 press conference

    On June 8, 2011, the California Senate Elections Committee approved the National Popular Vote bill (AB 459).

    On May 19, 2011, the California Assembly passed the National Popular Vote bill by a 51–21–8 vote.

    On May 4, 2011, the Assembly Appropriationi>s Committee approved the National Popular Vote bill (AB 459) by a 14–2–1 vote.

    On April 12, 2011, the Assembly Elections and Redistricting Committee approved the National Popular Vote bill (AB 459) by a 5–1 vote (with one abstention).

    On March 31, 2011, California Assembly Democratic Caucus Chair Jerry Hill joined Republican Caucus Chair Brian Nestande in sponsoring the National Popular Vote bill (AB 459) in California in 2011.

    On August 14, 2008, the California legislature gave final approval to the National Popular Vote bill and sent it to the governor; however, the governor vetoed the bill. (SB 37) (History of SB 37).

    A Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) in October 2008 showed that 70 percent of residents and likely voters would support a national popular vote for President, while 21 percent of residents and 22 percent of likely voters would prefer that the current system. Among likely voters, support for this change is 6 points higher than in October 2004 (64%).

    On June 30, 2008, the California Assembly passed the National Popular Vote bill.

    In 2007, an initiative petition was circulated to put the question on the June 2008 ballot in California the question of whether California's electoral votes should be allocated by congressional district. The petition did not receive the required number of signatures to qualify for the ballot.      See discussion

    On May 14, 2007, the California Senate passed the National Popular Vote bill.

    The National Popular Vote bill (SB 37) was sponsored in the California legislature in 2007 by Senators Carole Migden, Ron Calderon, Alan S. Lowenthal, Jenny Oropeza, Jack Scott, and Leland Yee and Assembly Members Mervyn M. Dymally, Loni Hancock, and Ted W. Lieu. Skelton April 11, 2007 column from Los Angeles Times.

    On March 21, 2007, SB 37 was approved by the Senate Committee on Elections, Redistricting, and Constitutional Amendments.


    California Assembly Elections and Redistricting Committee on April 25, 2006, showing (left to right at witness table) Dr. John R. Koza, originator of the National Popular Vote plan, Assembly member Tom Umberg (Orange County), the bill’s sponsor in California and chair of the Committee, and Ethan Jones, Consultant to the Committee in 2006.


    California Assemblyman Tom Umberg (Orange County), sponsor of AB 2948, wants to make every vote equal in presidential elections.

    The National Popular Vote bill (AB 2948) (Status of AB 2948) was sponsored in the California Legislature in the 2006 session by Tom Umberg (chair of the Assembly Elections and Reapportionment Committee), Mervyn M. Dymally, John Laird, Loni Hancock, Mark Leno, and Ted W. Lieu as well as Senator Jack Scott. The bill was managed in the California Senate in 2006 by Senator Debra Bowen (who was elected California Secretary of State in November 2006). The 2006 bill was vetoed on September 30, 2006.
    Skelton April 11, 2007 column from Los Angeles Times      Los Angeles Times 2006 editorial      Sacramento Bee editorial

    On August 30, 2006, the California Legislature gave its approval to AB 2948 (passed in the Senate on August 22 and earlier in the Assembly on May 30) to implement nationwide election of the President. In the Assembly debate, Assemblyman Rick Keene (Chico) said:

    "Frankly the current system does not work. ... Presidential candidates don't bother to visit the largest state in the Union. ... What California thinks doesn't matter. ... We don't matter in the equation. ... We are currently disenfranchised in the process. ... We need to do something about this."

    On September 21, 2006, George Skelton of the Los Angeles Times wrote:

    "Among the 500-plus bills sitting on the governor's desk is one that would thrust him to the forefront of a budding national movement to extend direct democracy to presidential elections. He has 10 days to sign or veto the bill by Assemblyman Tom Umberg (D-Anaheim) that would mark the first step in rendering moot the anachronistic Electoral College. The goal is to assure that the candidate most Americans vote for is elected president. No more battleground states or spectator states. Every state would be in play. Every vote would count. Schwarzenegger's signature on the Umberg bill would make California the first state to ratify an interstate compact obligating each signatory to cast all its electoral votes for the presidential candidate who wins the national popular vote."

    On September 6, 2006, a Sacramento Bee editorial said:

    "After 55 presidential elections, it's time to acknowledge that the presidency is a national office calling for direct election by the American people. With California's leadership, this can happen. Schwarzenegger should sign this historic bill, as he did the greenhouse gas emissions bill. Both bills put California at the forefront of states providing 21st century solutions to much older problems."




    California Assemblymember Jerry Hill
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    California Assemblymember Tom Umberg
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    California Assemblymember Ted W. Lieu
    Wikipedia Entry
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Mark Leno
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    California Assemblymember Loni Hancock
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site
    Political Web Site 2


    California Assemblymember John Laird
    Legislative Web Site
    Political Web Site


    California Assemblymember Mervyn M.Dymally
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    Political Web Site


    California Senator Ron Calderon
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    Political Web Site


    California Senator Alan S. Lowenthal
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    California Senator Jenny Oropeza
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    California Senator Leland Yee
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    California Senator Elaine Alquist
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    California Senator Mark Ridley-Thomas
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    California Senator Tom Torlakson
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    California Assemblymember Juan Arambula
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    California Assemblymember Jim Beall Jr.
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    California Assemblymember Julia Brownley
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    California Assemblymember Mike Eng
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    California Assemblymember Mike Davis
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    California Assemblymember Mark DeSaulnier
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    California Assemblymember Noreen Evans
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    California Assemblymember Betty Karnette
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    California Assemblymember Lloyd Levine
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    California Assemblymember Sally Lieber
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    California Assemblymember Fiona Ma
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    California Assemblymember Tony Mendoza
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    California Speaker Fabian Nunez
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    California Assemblymember Anthony Portantino
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    California Assemblymember Curren Price
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    California Assemblymember Sandre Swanson
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    California Assemblymember Lois Wolk
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    California Senator Carole Migden
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    California Senator Jack Scott
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    California Assemblymember Tom Umberg
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Ted W. Lieu
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    California Assemblymember Mark Leno
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    California Assemblymember Loni Hancock
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember John Laird
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Mervyn M.Dymally
    Legislative Web Site


    California Senator Ron Calderon
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    California Senator Alan S. Lowenthal
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    California Senator Jenny Oropeza
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    California Senator Leland Yee
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    California Senator Elaine Alquist
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    California Senator Mark Ridley-Thomas
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    California Senator Tom Torlakson
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Juan Arambula
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Jim Beall Jr.
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Julia Brownley
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    California Assemblymember Mike Eng
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Mike Davis
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Mark DeSaulnier
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    California Assemblymember Noreen Evans
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Betty Karnette
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Lloyd Levine
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Sally Lieber
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Fiona Ma
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Tony Mendoza
    Legislative Web Site


    California Speaker Fabian Nunez
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Anthony Portantino
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Curren Price
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Sandre Swanson
    Legislative Web Site


    California Assemblymember Lois Wolk
    Legislative Web Site


    California Senator Carole Migden
    Legislative Web Site


    California Senator Jack Scott
    Legislative Web Site
    Under the current system of electing the President, a candidate may win a majority of the Electoral College without having a majority of the nationwide popular vote. The National Popular Vote bill would reform the Electoral College by guaranteeing the Presidency to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia). The bill would enact the proposed interstate compact entitled the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote." The compact would take effect only when enacted, in identical form, by states possessing a majority of the membership of the Electoral College (that is 270 of 538 electoral votes). Under the compact, all of the members of the Electoral College from all states belonging to the compact would be from the same political party as the winner of nationwide popular vote. Thus, the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and the District of Columbia) will be guaranteed a majority of the Electoral College, and hence the Presidency. Because the compact guarantees a majority of the Electoral College to the winner of most popular votes nationwide, the compact has the additional benefit of eliminating the possibility that a presidential election might be thrown into the U.S. House of Representatives (with each state casting one vote).


    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President