"Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors ..." -- U.S. Constitution
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In addition to 1,129 state legislative sponsors (shown above), 981 other legislators have cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.
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Short Explanation
The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee a majority of the Electoral College to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The bill would reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote in the Electoral College reflects the choice of the nation's voters for President of the United States.   more
11 Enactments
The National Popular Vote bill has been enacted into law in states possessing 165 electoral votes — 61% of the 270 electoral votes needed to activate the legislation.

  • Maryland - 10 votes
  • Massachusetts - 11
  • Washington - 12 votes
  • Vermont - 3 votes
  • Rhode Island - 4 votes
  • DC - 3 votes
  • Hawaii - 4 votes
  • New Jersey - 14 votes
  • Illinois - 20 votes
  • New York - 29 votes
  • California - 55 votes

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    Sacramento Bee
    Lawmakers want California to join National Popular Vote effort
    Capitol Alert
    March 30, 2011

    Two lawmakers are looking to give nation's most populous state more sway in presidential campaigns, pushing legislation to sign on to an effort that would replace the electoral college system with a national popular vote.

    Assembly Bill 459 is part of a nationwide push for states to approve the "National Popular Vote bill." States that enact the bill agree to award all of their electoral votes to the candidate who wins the overall popular vote. Supporters say the change would force candidates to look beyond a handful of "swing states" in their campaigns, spending resources and time throughout the country.

    "Swing states will be a thing of the past," said Assemblyman Jerry Hill, a co-author of the bill. "Candidates will actually focus on getting votes from people everywhere, just not particular votes in a particular state."

    Assemblyman Brian Nestande, R-Palm Desert, said the current system has made California "totally irrelevant" in the national political arena.

    "We're basically on our own. As the largest state in the union I think it's important our voices are heard," said Nestande, who argued that national candidate visits boost visibility for state and federal candidates as well as voter morale.

    They said 2008 presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain made zero California campaign trips in the general election, aside from stops solely aimed at refueling campaign coffers. It would be harder, they said, to pass up millions of California votes.

    Two lawmakers are looking to give nation's most populous state more sway in presidential campaigns, pushing legislation to sign on to an effort that would replace the electoral college system with a national popular vote.

    Assembly Bill 459 is part of a nationwide push for states to approve the "National Popular Vote bill." States that enact the bill agree to award all of their electoral votes to the candidate who wins the overall popular vote. Supporters say the change would force candidates to look beyond a handful of "swing states" in their campaigns, spending resources and time throughout the country.

    "Swing states will be a thing of the past," said Assemblyman Jerry Hill, a co-author of the bill. "Candidates will actually focus on getting votes from people everywhere, just not particular votes in a particular state."

    Assemblyman Brian Nestande, R-Palm Desert, said the current system has made California "totally irrelevant" in the national political arena.

    "We're basically on our own. As the largest state in the union I think it's important our voices are heard," said Nestande, who argued that national candidate visits boost visibility for state and federal candidates as well as voter morale.

    They said 2008 presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain made zero California campaign trips in the general election, aside from stops solely aimed at refueling campaign coffers. It would be harder, they said, to pass up millions of California votes.


    Reform the Electoral College so that the electoral vote reflects the nationwide popular vote for President